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Identification and characterization of polyamine metabolism in citrus in response to ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ infection

Citation
Qifang et al. (2024). Phytopathology®
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Abstract
Citrus Huanglongbing, one of the most devastating citrus diseases, is caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas). Polyamines are aliphatic nitrogen-containing compounds that play important roles in disease resistance. However, the role of polyamine metabolism in the tolerance of citrus to infection with CLas have not been extensively studied. We used HPLC and UPLC-Q/TOF-MS to detect the contents of nine polyamine metabolism-related compounds (PMRCs) in six citrus cultivars with varying

Microscopic and metatranscriptomic analyses revealed unique cross-domain parasitism between phylum Candidatus Patescibacteria/candidate phyla radiation and methanogenic archaea in anaerobic ecosystems

Citation
Kuroda et al. (2024). mBio
Names
Ca. Patescibacteria
Abstract
Culture-independent DNA sequencing approaches have explored diverse yet-to-be-cultured microorganisms and have significantly expanded the tree of life in recent years. One major lineage of the domain Bacteria, Ca . Patescibacteria (also known as candidate phyla radiation), is widely distributed in natural and engineered ecosystems and has been thought to be dependent on host bacteria due to the lack of several biosynthetic pathways and small cell/genome size.

The ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma ziziphi’ effectors SJP1/2 negatively control leaf size by stabilizing ZjTCP2 in jujube

Citation
Ma et al. (2024). Journal of Experimental Botany
Names
Ca. Phytoplasma ziziphi
Abstract
Abstract Phytoplasmas manipulate host plant development to benefit their invasion and insect vector colonization. However, the virulence factors and mechanisms underlying small leaf formation caused by jujube witches’ broom (JWB) phytoplasmas remain largely unknown. Here, effectors SJP1 and SJP2 from JWB phytoplasmas were identified to induce small leaf formation in jujube. In vivo interaction and expression assays showed that SJP1 and SJP2 interacted with and stabilized ZjTCP2. O

First Report of the Association of the Psyllid Vector Bactericera trigonica (Hemiptera: Triozidae) with ‘Candidatus Liberibacter Solanacearum’ in Italy

Citation
Bertinelli et al. (2024). Insects 15 (2)
Names
“Liberibacter solanacearum” Liberibacter
Abstract
Psyllids, members of the family Triozidae, represent a potential threat to the cultivation of solanaceous and apiaceous crops worldwide, mainly as vectors of the phloem-restricted bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso). The Lso haplotypes C, D and E are known to affect apiaceous crops, such as carrot and celery, in several European countries. In Italy, data on the incidence and natural spread of both Lso and psyllids have not been reported so far. In this study, the presence of t

ABA-CsABI5-CsCalS11 module upregulates Callose deposition of citrus infected with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus

Citation
Yao et al. (2024). Horticulture Research 11 (2)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Abstract
Abstract Huanglongbing (HLB) primarily caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) has been threatening citrus production globally. Under HLB conditions, an excessive accumulation of the polysaccharide callose in citrus phloem occurs, leading to phloem blockage and starch accumulation in leaves. The callose production is controlled by callose synthases (CalS), which have multiple members within plants. However, the knowledge of callose production in the citrus upon infectio

Candidatus Methanosphaera massiliense sp. nov., a methanogenic archaeal species found in a human fecal sample and prevalent in pigs and red kangaroos

Citation
Pilliol et al. (2024). Microbiology Spectrum 12 (2)
Names
Ca. Methanosphaera massiliense
Abstract
ABSTRACT Methanosphaera stadtmanae was the sole Methanosphaera representative to be cultured and detected by molecular methods in the human gut microbiota, further associated with digestive and respiratory diseases, leaving unknown the actual diversity of human-associated Methanosphaera species. Here, a novel Methanosphaera species, Candidatus Methanosphaera massilie

First Report of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma australasiaticum' Associated with Phyllody, Virescence, and Witches’-Broom Disease in Chrysanthemum morifolium in Taiwan

Citation
Tseng et al. (2024). Plant Disease
Names
Ca. Phytoplasma australasiaticum Ca. Phytoplasma australasiae
Abstract
Chrysanthemum morifolium (Asteraceae) is commonly grown as commercial cut flowers or pot mums worldwide. Common diseases of chrysanthemum include bacterial blight, fungal diseases, viruses, and phytoplasmas (Verma et al. 2003; Taloh et al. 2020). In June 2022, C. morifolium plants showing virescence, stunting, witches’ broom, and phyllody symptoms were observed in 10 plants representing 10% of the estimated 100 plants in a field in Taichung City, Taiwan (Fig. S1). Three symptomatic samples alon

Detection of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus and five viruses in individual Asian citrus psyllid in China

Citation
Liu et al. (2024). Frontiers in Plant Science 15
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Abstract
IntroductionAsian citrus psyllid (ACP, Diaphorina citri) is an important transmission vector of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” (CLas), the causal agent of Huanglongbing (HLB), the most destructive citrus disease in the world. As there are currently no HLB-resistant rootstocks or varieties, the control of ACP is an important way to prevent HLB. Some viruses of insect vectors can be used as genetically engineered materials to control insect vectors.MethodsTo gain knowledge on viruses in ACP i

Genomic Insights into the Symbiotic and Plant Growth-Promoting Traits of “Candidatus Phyllobacterium onerii” sp. nov. Isolated from Endemic Astragalus flavescens

Citation
Eren Eroğlu et al. (2024). Microorganisms 12 (2)
Names
Ca. Phyllobacterium onerii
Abstract
A novel strain of Gram-negative, rod-shaped aerobic bacteria, identified as IY22, was isolated from the root nodules of Astragalus flavescens. The analysis of the 16S rDNA and recA (recombinase A) gene sequences indicated that the strain belongs to the genus Phyllobacterium. During the phylogenetic analysis, it was found that strain IY22 is closely related to P. trifolii strain PETP02T and P. bourgognense strain STM 201T. The genome of IY22 was determined to be 6,010,116 base pairs long with a D