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A ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ Haplotype B-Specific Family of Candidate Bacterial Effectors

Citation
Levy et al. (2023). Phytopathology® 113 (9)
Names
“Liberibacter solanacearum”
Abstract
‘ Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso) is a phloem-limited pathogen associated with devastating diseases in members of the Solanaceae and Apiaceae and vectored by several psyllid species. Different Lso haplotypes have been identified, and LsoA and LsoB are responsible for diseases in Solanaceae crops. Our efforts are aimed at identifying pathogenicity factors used by this bacterium to thrive in different hosts. Bacterial secreted proteins can play a role in host colonization or the manip

Detección de Candidatus Phytoplasma trifolii en plantas de chile para secado con síntomas de yema grande

Citation
Velásquez-Valle et al. (2023). Revista Chapingo Serie Zonas Áridas 21 (2)
Names
Ca. Phytoplasma trifolii
Abstract
El cultivo de chile en el norte centro de México es dañado por la infección causada por Candidatus Phytoplasma trifolii. Los síntomas de la enfermedad incluyen clorosis, deformación foliar, enanismo y sobredesarrollo floral (yema grande) con necrosis de pistilo y anteras. La distribución de yemas grandes en la planta es irregular. Ello sugiere que el patógeno o sus efectores se moverían irregularmente dentro de la planta. Por lo tanto, el objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la presencia de C

Candidatus Subterrananammoxibiaceae,” a New Anammox Bacterial Family in Globally Distributed Marine and Terrestrial Subsurfaces

Citation
Zhao et al. (2023). Applied and Environmental Microbiology 89 (8)
Names
Ca. Subterrananammoxibiaceae
Abstract
Microorganisms called anammox bacteria are efficient in removing bioavailable nitrogen from many natural and human-made environments. They exist in almost every anoxic habitat where both ammonium and nitrate/nitrite are present.

First report of ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris’ associated with yellowing, scorching and decline of almond trees in India

Citation
Gupta et al. (2023). PeerJ 11
Names
Ca. Phytoplasma asteris Ca. Phytoplasma
Abstract
The almond, a commercially important tree nut crop worldwide, is native to the Mediterranean region. Stone fruit trees are affected by at least 14 ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma’ species globally, among which ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris’ is one of the most widespread phytoplasma infecting Prunus dulcis, causing aster yellows disease. Recently, almond plantations of Nauni region were consistently affected by phytoplasma, as evidenced by visible symptoms, fluorescent microscopic studies and molecular

Microscopic and metatranscriptomic analyses revealed unique cross-domain symbiosis betweenCandidatusPatescibacteria/candidate phyla radiation (CPR) and methanogenic archaea in anaerobic ecosystems

Citation
Kuroda et al. (2023).
Names
Ca. Yanofskybacteria Ca. Patescibacteria Ca. Paceibacteria
Abstract
AbstractTo verify the parasitic lifestyle ofCandidatusPatescibacteria in the enrichment cultures derived from a methanogenic bioreactor, we applied multifaceted approaches combining cultivation, microscopy, metatranscriptomic, and protein structure prediction analyses. Cultivation experiments with the addition of exogenous methanogenic archaea with acetate, amino acids, and nucleoside monophosphates and 16S rRNA gene sequencing confirmed the increase in the relative abundance ofCa. Patescibacter

Mycoplasma hominis and Candidatus Mycoplasma girerdii in Trichomonas vaginalis: Peaceful Cohabitants or Contentious Roommates?

Citation
Margarita et al. (2023). Pathogens 12 (9)
Names
Ca. Mycoplasma girerdii
Abstract
Trichomonas vaginalis is a pathogenic protozoan diffused worldwide capable of infecting the urogenital tract in humans, causing trichomoniasis. One of its most intriguing aspects is the ability to establish a close relationship with endosymbiotic microorganisms: the unique association of T. vaginalis with the bacterium Mycoplasma hominis represents, to date, the only example of an endosymbiosis involving two true human pathogens. Since its discovery, several aspects of the symbiosis between T. v