General Medicine


Publications
576

Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’-Encoded BCP Peroxiredoxin Suppresses Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Defense Signaling and Nitrosative Stress In Planta

Citation
Jain et al. (2022). Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions® 35 (3)
Names
Liberibacter Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Abstract
The lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of gram-negative bacteria trigger a nitrosative and oxidative burst in both animals and plants during pathogen invasion. Liberibacter crescens strain BT-1 is a surrogate for functional genomic studies of the uncultured pathogenic ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’ spp. that are associated with severe diseases such as citrus greening and potato zebra chip. Structural determination of L. crescens LPS revealed the presence of a very long chain fatty acid modification. L. cresc

Not Just a Cycle: Three gab Genes Enable the Non-Cyclic Flux Toward Succinate via GABA Shunt in ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’–Infected Citrus

Citation
Nehela, Killiny (2022). Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions® 35 (3)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Abstract
Although the mitochondria retain all required enzymes for an intact tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, plants might shift the cyclic flux from the TCA cycle to an alternative noncyclic pathway via γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt under specific physiological conditions. We hypothesize that several genes may ease this noncyclic flux and contribute to the citrus response to the phytopathogenic bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’, the causal agent of Huanglongbing in citrus. To test this hy

CANDIDATUS LIST No. 3. Lists of names of prokaryotic Candidatus taxa

Citation
Oren, Garrity (2022). International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 72 (1)
Names
Elulimicrobiia “Saccharimonadia” “Ozemibacteria” “Caenarcanales” “Fibrimonadales” “Methanoflorentales” “Ozemibacterales” “Fibrimonadaceae” “Ozemibacteraceae” “Acidiflorens” “Annandiella” “Aramenus” “Arocatia” “Changshengia” “Cibionibacter” “Cuticulibacterium” “Didemniditutus” “Endohaliclona” “Euplotella” “Fibrimonas” “Forterrea” “Ischnodemia” “Neowolbachia” “Nitrobium” “Ozemibacter” “Paracaedimonas” “Parafinniella” “Pleuronema” “Reconciliibacillus” “Roseilinea” “Rubidus” “Stammera” “Theodorhartigia” “Acidiflorens stordalenmirensis” “Anadelfobacter sociabilis” “Anaerococcus massiliensis” “Anaerococcus phoceensis” “Anaerococcus timonensis” “Annandiella adelgistsugae” “Annandiella pinicola” “Aramenus sulfurataquae” “Arocatia carayonii” “Azospirillum massiliense” “Bandiella numerosa” “Desulfofervidia” “Macinerneyibacteriia” “Nanohalobiia” “Nanoperiodontomorbia” “Nanosyncoccia” “Syntrophaliphaticia” “Undinarchaeia” “Bartonella gerbillinarum” “Bartonella khokhlovae” “Bartonella negevensis” “Bartonella rudakovii” “Borrelia africana” “Borrelia ivorensis” “Borrelia fainii” “Brocadia braziliensis” “Cibionibacter quicibialis” “Clostridium massiliense” “Clostridium timonense” “Cuticulibacterium kirbyi” “Cytophaga massiliensis” “Desulfopertinax cowenii” Desulfosporosinus infrequens “Didemniditutus mandelae” “Ehrlichia regneryi” “Ehrlichia shimanensis” “Endohaliclona renieramycinifaciens” “Adiutricales” “Desulfofervidales” “Fermentimicrarchaeales” “Entotheonella gemina” “Euplotella sexta” “Finniella dimorpha” “Fibrimonas termitidis” “Forterrea multitransposorum” “Halobeggiatoa borealis” “Ischnodemia utriculi” “Liberibacter brunswickensis” “Mastigocoleus perforans” “Methanoflorens crillii” “Mycoplasma erythrocervae” “Guanabaribacteriales” “Hakubellales” “Macinerneyibacteriales” “Methylospongiales” “Naiadarchaeales” “Nanogingivalales” “Nanohalobiales” “Tepidaquicellales” “Adiutricaceae” “Aminobacteroidaceae” “Chazhemtonibacteriaceae” “Fermentimicrarchaeaceae” “Hakubellaceae” “Macinerneyibacteriaceae” “Magnetomoraceae” “Nanogingivalaceae” “Nanohalobiaceae” “Tepidaquicellaceae” “Thiobarbaceae” “Undinarchaeaceae” “Abditibacter” “Acidifodinimicrobium” “Aminobacteroides” “Anthektikosiphon” “Vallotia laricis” “Vallotia japonica” “Typhincola belonochilicola” “Treponema suis” “Mycoplasma haematomelis” “Nardonella dryophthoridicola” “Nardonella hylobii” “Neoehrlichia tanzaniensis” “Neowolbachia serbiensis” “Tokpelaia hoelldobleri” “Ozemibacter sibiricus” “Paracaedimonas acanthamoebae” “Parafinniella ignota” “Peptoniphilus massiliensis” “Piscichlamydia cyprini” “Pleuronema perforans” “Pleuronema testarum” “Profftia japonica” “Profftia laricis” “Pseudomonas adelgistsugae” “Reconciliibacillus cellulosivorans” “Rickettsia laoensis” “Rickettsia mahosoti” “Roseilinea gracilis” “Sedimenticola endophacoides” “Spiroplasma holothuriicola” “Stammera capsulata” “Synechococcus calcipolaris” “Theodorhartigia pinicola” “Thiosymbium robbeae” “Weimeria bifida”
Abstract

Candidatus Thiovulum sp. strain imperiosus: the largest free-living Epsilonproteobacteraeota Thiovulum strain lives in a marine mangrove environment

Citation
Sylvestre et al. (2022). Canadian Journal of Microbiology 68 (1)
Names
Ca. Thiovulum imperiosus
Abstract
A large (47.75 ± 3.56 µm in diameter) Thiovulum bacterial strain forming white veils is described from a marine mangrove ecosystem. High sulfide concentrations (up to 8 mM of H2S) were measured on sunken organic matter (wood/bone debris) under laboratory conditions. This sulfur-oxidizing bacterium colonized the organic matter, forming a white veil. According to conventional scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations, bacterial cells are ovoid and slightly motile by numerous small flagella

Dual Transcriptional Profiling of Carrot and ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ at Different Stages of Infection Suggests Complex Host-Pathogen Interaction

Citation
Wang et al. (2021). Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions® 34 (11)
Names
“Liberibacter solanacearum”
Abstract
The interactions between the phloem-limited pathogen ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ haplotype C and carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus) were studied at 4, 5, and 9 weeks postinoculation (wpi), by combining dual RNA-Seq results with data on bacterial colonization and observations of the plant phenotype. In the infected plants, genes involved in jasmonate biosynthesis, salicylate signaling, pathogen-associated molecular pattern- and effector-triggered immunity, and production of pathoge

Taxonomic note on the family Pseudonocardiaceae based on phylogenomic analysis and descriptions of Allosaccharopolyspora gen. nov. and Halosaccharopolyspora gen. nov

Citation
Teo et al. (2021). International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 71 (10)
Names
Pseudonocardiaceae Amycolatopsis Actinoalloteichus cyanogriseus T Actinoalloteichus Actinoalloteichus caeruleus
Abstract
The taxonomic positions of members within the family Pseudonocardiaceae were assessed based on phylogenomic trees reconstructed using core-proteome and genome blast distance phylogeny approaches. The closely clustered genome sequences from the type strains of validly published names within the family Pseudonocardiaceae wer

Valid publication of the names of forty-two phyla of prokaryotes

Citation
Oren, Garrity (2021). International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 71 (10)
Names
Acidobacterium Actinomyces Aquifex Armatimonas Atribacterota Atribacter Bacillus Actinomycetota Myxococcota Bacillota Chloroflexota Pseudomonadota Acidobacteriota Chlamydiota Planctomycetota “Thermofontia” Verrucomicrobiota Elusimicrobiota Nitrososphaerota Cenarchaeales
Abstract
After the International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes (ICSP) had voted to include the rank of phylum in the rules of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes (ICNP), and following publication of the decision in the IJSEM, we here present names and formal descriptions of 42 phyla to effect valid publication of their names, based on genera as the nomenclatural types.