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First Report of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ Associated with Huanglongbing in Sweet Orange in Ethiopia

Citation
Saponari et al. (2010). Plant Disease 94 (4)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Abstract
Huanglongbing (HLB) is a serious disease of citrus worldwide. Three different ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’ species are associated with HLB: ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’, ‘Ca. L. africanus’, and ‘Ca. L. americanus’ (1). ‘Ca. L. africanus’ and its vector, Trioza erytreae, are both heat sensitive, and when present, occur in citrus when temperatures remain below 30 to 32°C. In Africa, ‘Ca. L. africanus’ and T. erytreae have been reported in South Africa, Zimbabwe, Malawi, Burundi, Kenya, Somalia, Ethi

First Report of “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” on Field Tomatoes in the United States

Citation
French-Monar et al. (2010). Plant Disease 94 (4)
Names
“Liberibacter solanacearum”
Abstract
In August 2008, 30% of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants in plots in Lubbock County, Texas showed yellowing, lateral stem dieback, upward leaf curling, enlargement of stems, adventitious roots, and swollen nodes. Yellowing in leaves was similar to that seen with zebra chip disease (ZC) of potato that was confirmed in a potato field 112 km away in July 2008 and was associated with a ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’ species (1), similar to findings earlier in 2008 in New Zealand and California (2,3).

First Report of “Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous” or “Ca. Liberibacter solanacearum” Associated with Severe Foliar Chlorosis, Curling, and Necrosis and Tuber Discoloration of Potato Plants in Honduras

Citation
Rehman et al. (2010). Plant Disease 94 (3)
Names
“Liberibacter solanacearum” Ca. Liberibacter psyllaurous
Abstract
From 2006 to 2009, all commercial potato fields in Azacualpa F.M. Honduras were heavily infested with the potato psyllid Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc.). Plants exhibited interveinal chlorosis, vein-greening, downward curling, stunting, above ground tuber formation, and brownish flecks in some tubers. Disease incidence ranged from 50 to 95%. Leaf samples and psyllids were collected from seven fields in two potato-growing regions of Honduras. Total DNA was purified from the leaves of 30 symptomat

First Report of “Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous” (synonym “Ca. L. solanacearum”) Associated with ‘Tomato Vein-Greening’ and ‘Tomato Psyllid Yellows’ Diseases in Commercial Greenhouses in Arizona

Citation
Brown et al. (2010). Plant Disease 94 (3)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter psyllaurous
Abstract
During the winter of 2006–2007, plants in commercial tomato greenhouses (GH-1 and GH-2; total 320 acres [129.5 ha]) in Arizona were infested with the potato psyllid Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc) and more than 60% and ~20% of the plants, respectively, exhibited leaf curling, chlorosis, and shortened internodes. In addition, some plants in GH-1 developed an unusual ‘vein-greening’ phenotype. Nucleic acids were isolated from 10 symptomatic and three asymptomatic plants from each greenhouse. PCR pr

First Report of the Huanglongbing Bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ Infecting Satkara (Citrus macroptera) in India

Citation
Das, Kumar (2010). Plant Disease 94 (3)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Abstract
In India, satkara (Citrus macroptera) is found in the northeastern regions of Shella and Dowki near Cherrapunji in Meghalaya, the Jampui Hills of Tripura and Mizoram, and the Chendel District of Manipur. Locally, it is called satkara because ‘sat’ refers to multiples of seven and the fruit generally contains fourteen segments. The fruit is used in the preparation of pickles and its oil is used in the perfume industry. In January 2007, in Behliangchhip, Jampui Hills, Tripura, India, we noticed s