General Medicine


Publications
571

Methanobrevibacter millerae sp. nov. and Methanobrevibacter olleyae sp. nov., methanogens from the ovine and bovine rumen that can utilize formate for growth

Citation
Rea et al. (2007). International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 57 (3)
Names
“Methanocatella millerae”
Abstract
Four formate-utilizing methanogens were isolated from ovine (strain KM1H5-1PT) and bovine (strains AK-87, OCP and ZA-10T) rumen contents. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the methanogen strains were found to belong to the order Methanobacteriales in the genus Methanobrevibacter. Strains ZA-10T and KM1H5-1PT gained energy for growth by the reduction of CO2 to CH4 using H2 or formate exclusively as electron donors. Increasing formate concentrations to 220 mM in batch cultures increased th

‘Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii’, an endosymbiont of the tick Ixodes ricinus with a unique intramitochondrial lifestyle

Citation
Sassera et al. (2006). International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 56 (11)
Names
Ca. Midichloria Ca. Midichloria mitochondrii
Abstract
An intracellular bacterium with the unique ability to enter mitochondria exists in the European vector of Lyme disease, the hard tick Ixodes ricinus. Previous phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences suggested that the bacterium formed a divergent lineage within the Rickettsiales (Alphaproteobacteria). Here, we present additional phylogenetic evidence, based on the gyrB gene sequence, that confirms the phylogenetic position of the bacterium. Based on these data, as well as electron

Isolates of ‘Candidatus Nostocoida limicola’ Blackall et al. 2000 should be described as three novel species of the genus Tetrasphaera, as Tetrasphaera jenkinsii sp. nov., Tetrasphaera vanveenii sp. nov. and Tetrasphaera veronensis sp. nov

Citation
McKenzie et al. (2006). International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 56 (10)
Names
Ca. Nostocoida limicola
Abstract
Despite differences in their morphologies, comparative analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed high levels of similarity (>94 %) between strains of the filamentous bacterium ‘Candidatus Nostocoida limicola’ and the cocci Tetrasphaera australiensis and Tetrasphaera japonica and the rod Tetrasphaera elongata, all isolated from activated sludge. These sequence data and their chemotaxonomic characters, including cell wall, menaquinone and lipid compositions and fingerprints of their 16S–23S

Amycolatopsis australiensis sp. nov., an actinomycete isolated from arid soils

Citation
Tan et al. (2006). International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 56 (10)
Names
Amycolatopsis australiensis
Abstract
The taxonomic position of a group of mesophilic actinomycetes isolated from arid Australian soils was determined using a polyphasic approach. The organisms shared chemical and morphological markers typical of members of the genus Amycolatopsis. They had identical 16S rRNA gene sequences and formed a distinct phyletic line in the Amycolatopsis mediterranei clade, being most closely related to A. mediterranei. In addition, they shared a range of phenotypic properties that distinguished them from r

‘Candidatus Phytoplasma americanum’, a phytoplasma associated with a potato purple top wilt disease complex

Citation
Lee et al. (2006). International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 56 (7)
Names
Ca. Phytoplasma americanum
Abstract
Potato purple top wilt (PPT) is a devastating disease that occurs in various regions of North America and Mexico. At least three distinct phytoplasma strains belonging to three different phytoplasma groups (16SrI, 16SrII and 16SrVI) have been associated with this disease. A new disease with symptoms similar to PPT was recently observed in Texas and Nebraska, USA. Two distinct phytoplasma strain clusters were identified. One belongs to the 16SrI phytoplasma group, subgroup A, and the other is a n

‘Candidatus Paenicardinium endonii’, an endosymbiont of the plant-parasitic nematode Heterodera glycines (Nemata: Tylenchida), affiliated to the phylum Bacteroidetes

Citation
Noel et al. (2006). International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 56 (7)
Names
Ca. Paenicardinium endonii
Abstract
Bacteria-like endosymbionts of females of the plant-parasitic nematodes Globodera rostochiensis and Heterodera goettingiana and juveniles of Heterodera glycines were first observed during transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies conducted in the 1970s. These organisms were characterized as being rod-shaped, ranging in size from 0.3 to 0.5 μm in diameter and 1.8 to 3 μm in length and containing structures labelled as striated inclusion bodies or tubular structures. A population of H. glycin

List of new names and new combinations previously effectively, but not validly, published

Citation
Anonymous (2006). International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 56 (7)
Names
“Actinobaculum massiliense”
Abstract
The purpose of this announcement is to effect the valid publication of the following new names and new combinations under the procedure described in the Bacteriological Code (1990 Revision). Authors and other individuals wishing to have new names and/or combinations included in future lists should send three copies of the pertinent reprint or photocopies thereof to the IJSEM Editorial Office for confirmation that all of the other requirements for valid publication have been met. It is also a req

‘Candidatus Streptomyces philanthi’, an endosymbiotic streptomycete in the antennae of Philanthus digger wasps

Citation
Kaltenpoth et al. (2006). International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 56 (6)
Names
Ca. Streptomyces philanthi
Abstract
Symbiotic interactions with bacteria are essential for the survival and reproduction of many insects. The European beewolf (Philanthus triangulum, Hymenoptera, Crabronidae) engages in a highly specific association with bacteria of the genus Streptomyces that appears to protect beewolf offspring against infection by pathogens. Using transmission and scanning electron microscopy, the bacteria were located in the antennal glands of female wasps, where they form dense cell clusters. Using genetic me