Tyson, Gene W.


Publications
13

Multi-heme cytochrome-mediated extracellular electron transfer by the anaerobic methanotroph ‘Candidatus Methanoperedens nitroreducens’

Citation
Zhang et al. (2023). Nature Communications 14 (1)
Names
Ca. Methanoperedens nitroreducens
Abstract
AbstractAnaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) carry out anaerobic oxidation of methane, thus playing a crucial role in the methane cycle. Previous genomic evidence indicates that multi-heme c-type cytochromes (MHCs) may facilitate the extracellular electron transfer (EET) from ANME to different electron sinks. Here, we provide experimental evidence supporting cytochrome-mediated EET for the reduction of metals and electrodes by ‘Candidatus Methanoperedens nitroreducens’, an ANME acclimated to

Insights into the ecological roles and evolution of methyl-coenzyme M reductase-containing hot spring Archaea

Citation
Hua et al. (2019). Nature Communications 10 (1)
Names
Ca. Methanoproducendum senex
Abstract
Abstract Several recent studies have shown the presence of genes for the key enzyme associated with archaeal methane/alkane metabolism, methyl-coenzyme M reductase (Mcr), in metagenome-assembled genomes (MAGs) divergent to existing archaeal lineages. Here, we study the mcr-containing archaeal MAGs from several hot springs, which reveal further expansion in the diversity of archaeal organisms performing methane/alkane metabolism. Significantly, an MAG basal to organisms from the phy

Recovery of nearly 8,000 metagenome-assembled genomes substantially expands the tree of life

Citation
Parks et al. (2017). Nature Microbiology 2 (11)
Names
Binatus Binatus soli Ts
Abstract
AbstractChallenges in cultivating microorganisms have limited the phylogenetic diversity of currently available microbial genomes. This is being addressed by advances in sequencing throughput and computational techniques that allow for the cultivation-independent recovery of genomes from metagenomes. Here, we report the reconstruction of 7,903 bacterial and archaeal genomes from >1,500 public metagenomes. All genomes are estimated to be ≥50% complete and nearly half are ≥90% complete with ≤5%