Agronomy and Crop Science


Publications
763

Hiding in plain sight: a widespread native perennial harbors diverse haplotypes of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' and its potato psyllid vector

Citation
Kenney et al. (2024). Phytopathology®
Names
“Liberibacter solanacearum”
Abstract
The unculturable bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (CLso) is responsible for a growing number of emerging crop diseases. However, we know little about the diversity and ecology of CLso and its psyllid vectors outside of agricultural systems, which limits our ability to manage crop disease and understand the impacts this pathogen may have on wild plants in natural ecosystems. In North America, CLso is transmitted to crops by the native potato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli). But

Putting ‘X’ into context: the diversity of ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma pruni’ strains associated with the induction of X-disease

Citation
Molnar et al. (2024). Plant Disease
Names
Ca. Phytoplasma pruni
Abstract
Recurrent epiphytotics of X-disease, caused by ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma pruni’, have inflicted significant losses on commercial cherry and peach production across North America in the last century. During this period, there have been multiple studies reporting different disease phenotypes, and more recently, identifying different strains through sequencing core genes, but the symptoms have not, to date, been linked with genotype. Therefore, in this study we collected and assessed differing disea

First report of Candidatus Phytoplasma australasia (16SrII- subgroup D) associated with virescence of Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) from India

Citation
Josna et al. (2024). Plant Disease
Names
Ca. Phytoplasma aurantifolia Ca. Phytoplasma australasia
Abstract
Chia (Salvia hispanica L., Lamiaceae) is an important commercial and medicinal crop recently popularized in India and widely cultivated in Karnataka (Joy et al., 2022). During the field survey of chia crop diseases, characteristic virescence like symptoms were observed at Main Agricultural Research Station, UAS, Raichur as well as at Mysuru and HD Kote region. The incidence was ranged from 2 – 4 per cent in an area of 30 hectares. Typical symptoms associated with chia are malformed shoot and/or

Grove-level analysis of titer and prevalence of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” and Wolbachia in Diaphorina citri, vector of citrus Huanglongbing

Citation
Mann et al. (2024). Phytobiomes Journal
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Abstract
Huanglongbing (HLB, or citrus greening disease) affects all citrus varieties world-wide. In the USA, Asia, and South America the causal agent is “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” (CLas), a phloem-limited, uncultured, alphaproteobacterium. The hemipteran insect vector, Diaphorina citri (Asian citrus psyllid) acquires and transmits CLas in a circulative, propagative manner. In addition to CLas, D. citri hosts multiple symbiotic bacterial species including Wolbachia (wDi). In D. citri, wDi has b

Trunk Injection of Citrus Trees with a Polymeric Nanobactericide Reduces Huanglongbing Severity Caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus

Citation
Guerrero-Santos et al. (2024). The Plant Pathology Journal 40 (2)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Abstract
Huanglongbing (HLB) is a disease caused by the phloem- limited Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) that affects the citrus industry worldwide. To date, only indirect strategies have been implemented to eradicate HLB. Included among these is the population control of the psyllid vector (Diaphorina citri), which usually provides inconsistent results. Even though strategies for direct CLas suppression seem a priori more promising, only a handful of reports have been focused on a confrontation

Effector Enrichment by Candidatus Liberibacter Promotes Diaphorina citri Feeding via Jasmonic Acid Pathway Suppression

Citation
Liu et al. (2024). Pest Management Science
Names
Liberibacter Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Abstract
AbstractBACKGROUNDCitrus huanglongbing (HLB) is a devastating disease caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) that affects the citrus industry. In nature, CLas relies primarily on Diaphorina citri Kuwayama as its vector for dissemination. After D. citri ingests CLas‐infected citrus, the pathogen infiltrates the insect's body, where it thrives, reproduces, and exerts regulatory control over the growth and metabolism of D. citri. Previous studies have shown that CLas alters the composit