Cell Biology


Publications (43)

Genetic Diversity of “ <i>Candidatus</i> Liberibacter asiaticus” Based on Four Hypervariable Genomic Regions in China

Citation
Gao et al. (2022). Microbiology Spectrum
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Subjects
Cell Biology Ecology General Immunology and Microbiology Genetics Infectious Diseases Microbiology (medical) Physiology
Abstract
The hypervariable genomic regions derived from 35 published C Las genomes were used to decipher the genetic diversity of C Las strains and identify 10 new strains with high variations in prophage regions. Characterizing these variations in the C Las bacteria might provide insight into their evolution and adaptation to host plants and insects in China.

SeqCode: a nomenclatural code for prokaryotes described from sequence data

Citation
Hedlund et al. (2022). Nature Microbiology
Names
“Kryptoniales” “Kryptoniia” “Kryptoniaceae” “Kryptonium mobile”
Subjects
Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology Cell Biology Genetics Immunology Microbiology Microbiology (medical)
Abstract
AbstractMost prokaryotes are not available as pure cultures and therefore ineligible for naming under the rules and recommendations of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes (ICNP). Here we summarize the development of the SeqCode, a code of nomenclature under which genome sequences serve as nomenclatural types. This code enables valid publication of names of prokaryotes based upon isolate genome, metagenome-assembled genome or single-amplified genome sequences. Otherwise, it is similar to the ICNP with regard to the formation of names and rules of priority. It operates through the SeqCode Registry (https://seqco.de/), a registration portal through which names and nomenclatural types are registered, validated and linked to metadata. We describe the two paths currently available within SeqCode to register and validate names, including Candidatus names, and provide examples for both. Recommendations on minimal standards for DNA sequences are provided. Thus, the SeqCode provides a reproducible and objective framework for the nomenclature of all prokaryotes regardless of cultivability and facilitates communication across microbiological disciplines.

Mutual Exclusion of <i>Methanobrevibacter</i> Species in the Human Gut Microbiota Facilitates Directed Cultivation of a <i>Candidatus</i> Methanobrevibacter Intestini Representative

Citation
Low et al. (2022). Microbiology Spectrum 10 (4)
Names
Methanobrevibacter
Subjects
Cell Biology Ecology General Immunology and Microbiology Genetics Infectious Diseases Microbiology (medical) Physiology
Abstract
Methanogens are important hydrogen consumers in the gut and are associated with differing host health. Here, we determine the prevalence and abundance of archaeal species in the guts of a multi-ethnic cohort of healthy Singapore residents.

A closed Candidatus Odinarchaeum chromosome exposes Asgard archaeal viruses

Citation
Tamarit et al. (2022). Nature Microbiology 7 (7)
Names
Ca. Odinarchaeum yellowstonii
Subjects
Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology Cell Biology Genetics Immunology Microbiology Microbiology (medical)
Abstract
AbstractAsgard archaea have recently been identified as the closest archaeal relatives of eukaryotes. Their ecology, and particularly their virome, remain enigmatic. We reassembled and closed the chromosome of Candidatus Odinarchaeum yellowstonii LCB_4, through long-range PCR, revealing CRISPR spacers targeting viral contigs. We found related viruses in the genomes of diverse prokaryotes from geothermal environments, including other Asgard archaea. These viruses open research avenues into the ecology and evolution of Asgard archaea.

Genomic insights into diverse bacterial taxa that degrade extracellular DNA in marine sediments

Citation
Wasmund et al. (2021). Nature Microbiology 6 (7)
Names
Ca. Izemoplasmatales Ca. Izemoplasma Ca. Izemoplasma acidinucleici
Subjects
Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology Cell Biology Genetics Immunology Microbiology Microbiology (medical)
Abstract
AbstractExtracellular DNA is a major macromolecule in global element cycles, and is a particularly crucial phosphorus, nitrogen and carbon source for microorganisms in the seafloor. Nevertheless, the identities, ecophysiology and genetic features of DNA-foraging microorganisms in marine sediments are largely unknown. Here, we combined microcosm experiments, DNA stable isotope probing (SIP), single-cell SIP using nano-scale secondary isotope mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) and genome-centric metagenomics to study microbial catabolism of DNA and its subcomponents in marine sediments. 13C-DNA added to sediment microcosms was largely degraded within 10 d and mineralized to 13CO2. SIP probing of DNA revealed diverse ‘Candidatus Izemoplasma’, Lutibacter, Shewanella and Fusibacteraceae incorporated DNA-derived 13C-carbon. NanoSIMS confirmed incorporation of 13C into individual bacterial cells of Fusibacteraceae sorted from microcosms. Genomes of the 13C-labelled taxa all encoded enzymatic repertoires for catabolism of DNA or subcomponents of DNA. Comparative genomics indicated that diverse ‘Candidatus Izemoplasmatales’ (former Tenericutes) are exceptional because they encode multiple (up to five) predicted extracellular nucleases and are probably specialized DNA-degraders. Analyses of additional sediment metagenomes revealed extracellular nuclease genes are prevalent among Bacteroidota at diverse sites. Together, our results reveal the identities and functional properties of microorganisms that may contribute to the key ecosystem function of degrading and recycling DNA in the seabed.