Plant Science


Publications (723)

Acquisition and transmission of “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” differs among Wolbachia-infected and -uninfected haplotypes of Bactericera cockerelli

Citation
Cooper et al. (2023). Plant Disease
Names
“Liberibacter solanacearum”
Subjects
Agronomy and Crop Science Plant Science
Abstract
“Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” (Lso) causes disease symptoms and economic losses in potato, tomato, and other solanaceous crops in North America. Lso is transmitted to plants by potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli, which occurs as distinct haplotypes named western, central, and northwestern that differ in presence or absence of the bacterial endosymbiont, Wolbachia. Previous work showed that all three vector haplotypes can transmit Lso, but it was not clear whether acquisition and transmission rates of Lso were equal among the haplotypes. The goal of our study was to compare Lso infection rates among psyllids of the western, central, and northwestern haplotypes. Using data collected from several years of periodic testing of Lso infection of laboratory-reared potato psyllid colonies, we showed that psyllids of the western and central haplotypes are more likely to harbor Lso than are psyllids of the northwestern haplotype. We then used greenhouse assays to demonstrate that psyllids of the northwestern haplotype are less likely to acquire and transmit Lso compared with those of the western haplotype. Lso infection rates corresponded with Wolbachia infection among the three psyllid haplotypes. The Wolbachia-infected central and western haplotypes were more likely to harbor and transmit Lso compared with the Wolbachia-free northwestern haplotype. Results demonstrate that potato psyllids of the western and central haplotypes pose a greater risk for spread of Lso in crops and suggest a pattern between infection with Lso and Wolbachia in potato psyllid.

Response of carrot seed germination to heat treatment, the emergency measure to reduce the risk of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ seed transmission

Citation
TIZZANI et al. (2023). Phytopathologia Mediterranea 61 (3)
Names
“Liberibacter solanacearum”
Subjects
Agronomy and Crop Science Horticulture Plant Science
Abstract
In Europe and the Mediterranean region, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso) is associated with emerging diseases of Apiaceae crops, mainly carrot. Emergency measures for import of carrot seed were set, requiring seed to be heat-treated at 50°C or tested as Lso-negative by PCR. The germination response to heat treatment was assessed for 24 carrot cultivar and hybrid seed lots. Ten parsley, five fennel, and two celery seed lots were also analysed. Of these 41 seed lots, 21 were Lso-infected. Water heat treatment significantly decreased germinability compared to dry heat treatment, indicating that dry heat treatment is a cheaper and less detrimental procedure. However, the dry heat treatment significantly decreased seed germination compared to untreated controls in four of 24 seed lots of carrot, four of ten parsley seed lots, three of five fennel seed lots, and one of two celery seed lots. For parsley, the heat treatment reduced germinability to a lesser extent in Lso-infected than Lso-free seed lots. These data show that heat treatment can affect the germination of Apiaceae seeds to varying degrees, depending on species or variety, the type of heat treatment, and the sanitary status of the seeds.

The African citrus psyllid Trioza erytreae: An efficient vector of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus

Citation
Reynaud et al. (2022). Frontiers in Plant Science 13
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Subjects
Plant Science
Abstract
IntroductionHuanglonbing (HLB) is the most serious disease of citrus in the world, associated with three non-cultivable phloem-restricted bacteria Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), Ca L. africanus (CLaf) and Ca L. americanus (CLam). CLas is transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri, and has spread to several countries. The African psyllid Trioza erytreae, the vector of CLaf occurs in Africa and neighbouring islands. Only two major citrus-growing regions - Australia/New Zealand and the Mediterranean Basin - are still HLB-free in the world. However, T. erytreae has recently been introduced into continental Europe (Portugal and Spain) and has become a potential threat to citrus production. The transmission of CLas by T. erytreae had been postulated but never tested. To evaluate the risk of T. erytreae transmitting CLas, comparative transmissions of CLas by T. erytreae and D. citri were assessed.MethodsTransmission tests were performed on excised leaves and seedlings of Citrus volkameriana with different inoculation access periods (in series) for both insect species. Quantifications of bacterial titers were made in excised leaves, seedlings three and six months after inoculation and on individual insects.ResultsOur results showed that T. erytreae was able to efficiently acquire CLas. Furthermore, T. erytreae carried significantly higher bacterial titers than D. citri, and was able to efficiently transmit the bacteria to seedlings at a similar rate that D. citri highlighting the high risk of spread of the most aggressive variant of HLB (CLas) by T. erytreae in Europe.DiscussionThus, extreme precautions to prevent any entry of CLas into Europe should be adopted.

Machine learning and analysis of genomic diversity of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” strains from 20 citrus production states in Mexico

Citation
Huang et al. (2022). Frontiers in Plant Science 13
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Subjects
Plant Science
Abstract
BackgroundHuanglongbing (HLB, yellow shoot disease) is a highly destructive citrus disease associated with a nonculturable bacterium, “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” (CLas), which is transmitted by Asian citrus psyllid (ACP, Diaphorina citri). In Mexico, HLB was first reported in Tizimin, Yucatán, in 2009 and is now endemic in 351 municipalities of 25 states. Understanding the population diversity of CLas is critical for HLB management. Current CLas diversity research is exclusively based on analysis of the bacterial genome, which composed two regions, chromosome (> 1,000 genes) and prophage (about 40 genes).Methods and resultsIn this study, 40 CLas-infected ACP samples from 20 states in Mexico were collected. CLas was detected and confirmed by PCR assays. A prophage gene(terL)-based typing system (TTS) divided the Mexican CLas strains into two groups: Term-G including four strains from Yucatán and Chiapas, as well as strain psy62 from Florida, USA, and Term-A included all other 36 Mexican strains, as well as strain AHCA1 from California, USA. CLas diversity was further evaluated to include all chromosomal and prophage genes assisted by using machine learning (ML) tools to resolve multidimensional data handling issues. A Term-G strain (YTMX) and a Term-A strain (BCSMX) were sequenced and analyzed. The two Mexican genome sequences along with the CLas genome sequences available in GenBank were studied. An unsupervised ML was implemented through principal component analysis (PCA) on average nucleotide identities (ANIs) of CLas whole genome sequences; And a supervised ML was implemented through sparse partial least squares discriminant analysis (sPLS-DA) on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of coding genes of CLas guided by the TTS. Two CLas Geno-groups, Geno-group 1 that extended Term-A and Geno-group 2 that extended Term-G, were established.ConclusionsThis study concluded that: 1) there were at least two different introductions of CLas into Mexico; 2) CLas strains between Mexico and USA are closely related; and 3) The two Geno-groups provide the basis for future CLas subspecies research.