Plant Science


Publications
808

Occurrence of Praxelis clematidea Witches’-Broom Disease Association with 16SrI Group ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris’ in Hainan Island of China

Citation
Yu et al. (2024). Plant Disease
Names
Ca. Phytoplasma asteris
Abstract
Praxelis clematidea is an invasive herbaceous plant belonging to Asteraceae family. From August to November 2020, the plants showing severe witches’-broom symptoms were found in farms and roadsides from Ding’an of Hainan Province, a tropical island of China. The disease symptoms were suggestive of phytoplasma infection. For pathogen detection, P. clematidea samples consisting of six symptomatic and three asymptomatic plants were collected from the farms and roadsites of Ding’an with 40 % incide

First Report of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma citri' related strain (16SrII-C subgroup) associated with phyllody disease of cumin in India

Citation
Kumar et al. (2024). Plant Disease
Names
Ca. Phytoplasma citri
Abstract
Cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.), is an important export-oriented seed spice crop for India. Cumin is popularly used for flavouring food, including soups, pickles and vegetables, and for herbal medicine. India is the largest producer, consumer and exporter of cumin seed with an annual production of 0.795 million tones over an area of 1.09 million hectares. During 2020-21, India exported about 0.299 million tons of cumin worth of Rs 33280 million (Anonymous, 2021). Recently, phytoplasma suspected symp

Influence of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ infection on carrot root weight in Germany

Citation
Sauer et al. (2024). European Journal of Plant Pathology
Names
“Liberibacter solanacearum”
Abstract
AbstractInfection with the bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso) is suspected to cause severe damage in carrot leading to high carrot weight loss. This study investigates three main aspects: (i) whether there is a reduction of carrot root weight under field conditions due to Lso infection; (ii) the correlation between Lso infection rate in carrot plants and occurrence of the psyllid Trioza apicalis as the known vector for Lso in carrot, and (iii) the comparison between symptoms

Identification and characterization of polyamine metabolism in citrus in response to ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ infection

Citation
Qifang et al. (2024). Phytopathology®
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Abstract
Citrus Huanglongbing, one of the most devastating citrus diseases, is caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas). Polyamines are aliphatic nitrogen-containing compounds that play important roles in disease resistance. However, the role of polyamine metabolism in the tolerance of citrus to infection with CLas have not been extensively studied. We used HPLC and UPLC-Q/TOF-MS to detect the contents of nine polyamine metabolism-related compounds (PMRCs) in six citrus cultivars with varying

The ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma ziziphi’ effectors SJP1/2 negatively control leaf size by stabilizing ZjTCP2 in jujube

Citation
Ma et al. (2024). Journal of Experimental Botany
Names
Ca. Phytoplasma ziziphi
Abstract
Abstract Phytoplasmas manipulate host plant development to benefit their invasion and insect vector colonization. However, the virulence factors and mechanisms underlying small leaf formation caused by jujube witches’ broom (JWB) phytoplasmas remain largely unknown. Here, effectors SJP1 and SJP2 from JWB phytoplasmas were identified to induce small leaf formation in jujube. In vivo interaction and expression assays showed that SJP1 and SJP2 interacted with and stabilized ZjTCP2. O

ABA-CsABI5-CsCalS11 module upregulates Callose deposition of citrus infected with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus

Citation
Yao et al. (2024). Horticulture Research 11 (2)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Abstract
Abstract Huanglongbing (HLB) primarily caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) has been threatening citrus production globally. Under HLB conditions, an excessive accumulation of the polysaccharide callose in citrus phloem occurs, leading to phloem blockage and starch accumulation in leaves. The callose production is controlled by callose synthases (CalS), which have multiple members within plants. However, the knowledge of callose production in the citrus upon infectio

First Report of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma australasiaticum' Associated with Phyllody, Virescence, and Witches’-Broom Disease in Chrysanthemum morifolium in Taiwan

Citation
Tseng et al. (2024). Plant Disease
Names
Ca. Phytoplasma australasiaticum Ca. Phytoplasma australasiae
Abstract
Chrysanthemum morifolium (Asteraceae) is commonly grown as commercial cut flowers or pot mums worldwide. Common diseases of chrysanthemum include bacterial blight, fungal diseases, viruses, and phytoplasmas (Verma et al. 2003; Taloh et al. 2020). In June 2022, C. morifolium plants showing virescence, stunting, witches’ broom, and phyllody symptoms were observed in 10 plants representing 10% of the estimated 100 plants in a field in Taichung City, Taiwan (Fig. S1). Three symptomatic samples alon

Detection of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus and five viruses in individual Asian citrus psyllid in China

Citation
Liu et al. (2024). Frontiers in Plant Science 15
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Abstract
IntroductionAsian citrus psyllid (ACP, Diaphorina citri) is an important transmission vector of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” (CLas), the causal agent of Huanglongbing (HLB), the most destructive citrus disease in the world. As there are currently no HLB-resistant rootstocks or varieties, the control of ACP is an important way to prevent HLB. Some viruses of insect vectors can be used as genetically engineered materials to control insect vectors.MethodsTo gain knowledge on viruses in ACP i