Search results (4)


First Report of ‘<i>Candidatus</i> Phytoplasma brasiliense’ in North America and in a New Host, Globe Sedge (<i>Cyperus globulosus</i>)

Citation
Di Lella et al. (2022). Plant Health Progress
Names
Ca. Phytoplasma brasiliense
Subjects
Horticulture Plant Science
Abstract
A survey of weeds was undertaken in a palm nursery affected by lethal bronzing (LB) to identify a reservoir host of the causal phytoplasma. Three common species were identified; Urochloa maxima (Guineagrass), Sporobolus indicus (smut grass), and Cyperus esculentus (yellow nutsedge) and sampled over a period of 2 years. Each species was sampled 36 times and all three species were negative for the LB phytoplasma. However, three specimens of C. esculentus tested positive for the phytoplasma species ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma brasiliense’. These findings represent the first documented case of ‘Ca. P. brasiliense’ in North America, specifically in Florida, U.S.A., as well as a new host record for the phytoplasma and the first monocot host documented. Because of the impact this phytoplasma has on papaya and hibiscus in South America, it presents a unique threat to ornamental and agricultural sectors in south Florida. An area-wide survey for the phytoplasma and potential vectors is recommended.

Huanglongbing, Caused by ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus,’ Detected in New Locations Across Southern and Coastal Georgia

Citation
Oliver et al. (2020). Plant Health Progress 21 (1)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Subjects
Horticulture Plant Science
Abstract
Huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening disease is the most devastating disease of citrus worldwide. This disease, caused by the bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (CLas), leads to low fruit quality and unproductive trees. In 2008, HLB was found in a residential citrus tree in Savannah, Georgia, and, as a result, the state has been quarantined for this disease since 2009. Nonetheless, little is known about the distribution of CLas within Georgia, even though the commercial planting of citrus in Georgia has increased exponentially in recent years. In 2019, 94 samples from commercial and residential citrus trees within 11 counties in coastal and southern Georgia were collected and tested for the presence of CLas. Molecular testing results revealed the presence of CLas in three counties where HLB had not been previously reported and in 9% of samples overall. This is the first definitive report confirming HLB in southern Georgia counties besides those along the coast.

Survey and Detection of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ in a Citrus Nursery Facility in South Texas

Citation
Alabi et al. (2014). Plant Health Progress 15 (4)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Subjects
Horticulture Plant Science
Abstract
Huanglongbing (HLB) disease, associated with ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (CLas), is primarily spread via infected citrus nursery trees and by infective Asian citrus psyllid, the insect vector. Recently, the Texas Department of Agriculture initiated regulations requiring commercial and retail citrus nurseries in Texas to transition from traditional open-field to enclosed facilities with insect-resistant screens to mitigate the risk of nurseries serving as sources of CLas. Although several nursery production facilities have adopted this regulation, non-enclosed nurseries persist and pose a significant threat to the citrus industry as potential sources of CLas. A systematic survey for HLB was embarked on in a semi-open nursery facility in South Texas in April 2014. Leaf tissue samples taken from 94 trees representing 5% of the total number of potted trees in the nursery were tested for CLas by quantitative and conventional PCR assays. Of 94 trees tested, 3.2% (3 trees) were positive for CLas by both assays. The presence of CLas in the PCR-positive samples was confirmed by multi-locus sequence analyses. The results represent the first report of HLB in a nursery facility in Texas, and underscore the need for more intensive surveillance for HLB in citrus nursery stock as an integral component of HLB mitigation efforts in Texas. Accepted for publication 27 August 2014. Published 15 December 2014.

Detection of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus from Wampee (Clausena lansium Skeels) by Nested PCR

Citation
Deng et al. (2007). Plant Health Progress 8 (1)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Subjects
Horticulture Plant Science
Abstract
Wampee (Clausena lansium Skeels) is native to southern China and Southeast Asia. Wampee trees are attractive, with grape-like fruits and a muscat taste and are popular in home gardens. Like other members of Rutaceae, wampee has long been suspected to have yellow shoot disease or Huanglongbing (HLB) and Diaphorina citri, the disease vector, was capable of a long-term survival on Wampee. The authors recommend that eradication of wampee trees surrounding citrus orchards should be part of the overall management of citrus HLB. Accepted for publication 20 December 2007. Published 19 April 2007.