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Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ Expands and Scavenges the Nutritional Choline Pool in Its Host Grapefruit (Citrus × paradisi) Leaves

Citation
Jain et al. (2023). PhytoFrontiers™ 3 (4)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Abstract
Phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) is an unusual membrane phospholipid present in some endosymbiotic and intracellular pathogenic prokaryotes. ‘ Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (CLas) is a phloem-limited, uncultured, fastidious α-Proteobacterium associated with the devastating citrus “greening” disease (huanglongbing). Phylogenetically related but nonpathogenic Liberibacter crescens (Lcr) was used as a culturable surrogate to examine PtdCho biosynthesis in pathogenic CLas. Genes encoding key enzym

Hemp Abnormal Growth Is Attributed to Mono-, Di-, or Tri-Infections of Spiroplasma citri, ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma trifolii’, and Beet Curly Top Virus

Citation
Schoener, Wang (2023). PhytoFrontiers™ 3 (4)
Names
Ca. Phytoplasma trifolii
Abstract
As hemp ( Cannabis sativa) emerges as a commercial crop in Nevada, mild to severe abnormal growth has been observed from many plants in commercial fields throughout the growing season. Affected plants exhibited a group of symptoms typically including stunting, leaf yellowing, excessive apical branching, clusters of witches’ broom, leaf rolling upwards, and leaf mottling and mosaic. These symptoms mostly showed up together in a plant or a crop and are defined here as abnormal growth syndrome (AG

Physiological and Transcriptomic Analysis of ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma pruni’ Infection in Prunus persica

Citation
Wright et al. (2023). PhytoFrontiers™ 3 (2)
Names
Ca. Phytoplasma pruni
Abstract
‘ Candidatus Phytoplasma pruni’ is the causative agent of X-disease on peach ( Prunus persica) trees. Infected trees exhibit premature yellowing, leaf necrosis causing a shot-hole appearance, limb dieback, and eventual death. How pathogen infection leads to these symptoms is unknown. This study undertook a modern characterization of the disease by assessing the physiological and transcriptomic consequences of phytoplasma infection. Phytoplasma titer was high in the symptomatic tissues and undet

Rapid Movement of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ on ‘Hamlin’ Sweet Orange and ‘Swingle’ Citrumelo Trunks

Citation
Pulici et al. (2023). PhytoFrontiers™ 3 (2)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Abstract
Huanglongbing (HLB), caused by phloem-limited ‘ Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (CLas), is the primary limiting factor of production in most citrus regions of the world. After infection, CLas is transported systemically throughout the phloem tissues following the source-sink movement. Split-root rhizoboxes and one-sided graft inoculation above the split trunk was used to understand if the vertical distance of the inoculum source and different anatomical structures (grafted or seedling trees)

Update and Validation of the 16S rDNA qPCR Assay for the Detection of Three ‘Candidatus Liberibacter Species’ Following Current MIQE Guidelines and Workflow

Citation
Osman et al. (2023). PhytoFrontiers™ 3 (1)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus Liberibacter
Abstract
An updated real-time multiplex quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay was designed and validated for the simultaneous detection of three ‘ Candidatus Liberibacter species’ (CLsp), ‘ Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ (CLas), ‘africanus’ (CLaf), and ‘americanus’ (CLam), associated with the huanglongbing disease of citrus. The multiplex assay was designed based on the qPCR assay published in 2006 by Li et al., considering all available CLsp 16S rRNA gene sequences in GenBank and the MIQE gu

Multi-omics Comparison Reveals Landscape of Citrus limon and Citrus sinensis Response to ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’

Citation
Chin et al. (2021). PhytoFrontiers™ 1 (2)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Abstract
Comparison of the metabolic changes prior to symptom development upon infection with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), the bacterium associated with citrus greening disease, between citrus hosts with different tolerances is lacking. The objective of this study was to compare the early response of Lisbon lemon (Citrus limon) and Washington navel orange (Citrus sinensis [L.] Osbeck), two citrus species commercially important to California, to CLas through graft inoculation. Here, we compa