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‘Candidatus Phytoplasma mali’, ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma pyri’ and ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma prunorum’, the causal agents of apple proliferation, pear decline and European stone fruit yellows, respectively

Citation
Seemuller et al. (2004). International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 54 (4)
Names
Ca. Phytoplasma pyri Ca. Phytoplasma prunorum Ca. Phytoplasma mali
Abstract
Apple proliferation (AP), pear decline (PD) and European stone fruit yellows (ESFY) are among the most economically important plant diseases that are caused by phytoplasmas. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the 16S rDNA sequences of strains of each of these pathogens were identical or nearly identical. Differences between the three phytoplasmas ranged from 1·0 to 1·5 % of nucleotide positions and were thus below the recommended threshold of 2·5 % for assigning species rank to phytoplasmas und

‘Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris’, a novel phytoplasma taxon associated with aster yellows and related diseases

Citation
Lee et al. (2004). International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 54 (4)
Names
Ca. Phytoplasma asteris
Abstract
Aster yellows (AY) group (16SrI) phytoplasmas are associated with over 100 economically important diseases worldwide and represent the most diverse and widespread phytoplasma group. Strains that belong to the AY group form a phylogenetically discrete subclade within the phytoplasma clade and are related most closely to the stolbur phytoplasma subclade, based on analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. AY subclade strains are related more closely to their culturable relatives, Acholeplasma spp., than

Clover proliferation phytoplasma: ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma trifolii’

Citation
Hiruki et al. (2004). International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 54 (4)
Names
Ca. Phytoplasma trifolii
Abstract
Clover proliferation phytoplasma (CPR) is designated as the reference strain for the CP phylogenetic group or subclade, on the basis of molecular analyses of genomic DNA, the 16S rRNA gene and the 16S–23S spacer region. Other strains related to CPR include alfalfa witches'-broom (AWB), brinjal little leaf (BLL), beet leafhopper-transmitted virescence (BLTV), Illinois elm yellows (ILEY), potato witches'-broom (PWB), potato yellows (PY), tomato big bud in California (TBBc) and phytoplasmas from Fr

‘Candidatus Phytoplasma cynodontis’, the phytoplasma associated with Bermuda grass white leaf disease

Citation
Marcone et al. (2004). International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 54 (4)
Names
Ca. Phytoplasma cynodontis
Abstract
Bermuda grass white leaf (BGWL) is a destructive, phytoplasmal disease of Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon). The causal pathogen, the BGWL agent, differs from other phytoplasmas that cluster in the same major branch of the phytoplasma phylogenetic clade in <2·5 % of 16S rDNA nucleotide positions, the threshold for assigning species rank to phytoplasmas under the provisional status ‘Candidatus’. Thus, the objective of this work was to examine homogeneity of BGWL isolates and to determine whethe

‘Candidatus Phytoplasma spartii’, ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma rhamni’ and ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma allocasuarinae’, respectively associated with spartium witches'-broom, buckthorn witches'-broom and allocasuarina yellows diseases

Citation
Marcone et al. (2004). International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 54 (4)
Names
Ca. Phytoplasma spartii Ca. Phytoplasma rhamni Ca. Phytoplasma allocasuarinae
Abstract
Spartium witches'-broom (SpaWB), buckthorn witches'-broom (BWB) and allocasuarina yellows (AlloY) are witches'-broom and yellows diseases of Spartium junceum (Spanish broom), Rhamnus catharticus (buckthorn) and Allocasuarina muelleriana (Slaty she-oak), respectively. These diseases are associated with distinct phytoplasmas. The SpaWB, BWB and AlloY phytoplasmas share <97·5 % 16S rDNA sequence similarity with each other and with other known phytoplasmas, including the closely related phytoplas

Symbionts of the gut flagellate Staurojoenina sp. from Neotermes cubanus represent a novel, termite-associated lineage of Bacteroidales: description of ‘Candidatus Vestibaculum illigatum’

Citation
Stingl et al. (2004). Microbiology 150 (7)
Names
Ca. Vestibaculum illigatum
Abstract
The symbioses between cellulose-degrading flagellates and bacteria are one of the most fascinating phenomena in the complex micro-ecosystem found in the hindgut of lower termites. However, little is known about the identity of the symbionts. One example is the epibiotic bacteria colonizing the surface of hypermastigote protists of the genusStaurojoenina. By using scanning electron microscopy, it was shown that the whole surface ofStaurojoeninasp. from the termiteNeotermes cubanusis densely cover

Candidatus B.A. und der„CANON” - Prozess

Citation
Jaenicke (2004). Chemie in unserer Zeit 36 (3)
Names
Abstract