Chen, J.


Publications (20)

Genome Sequence Resource of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ strain 9PA From Brazil

Citation
Silva et al. (2021). Plant Disease 105 (1)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Subjects
Agronomy and Crop Science Plant Science
Abstract
‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’, an unculturable α-proteobacterium, is associated with citrus huanglongbing (HLB), a devastating disease threatening citrus production in Brazil and worldwide. In this study, a draft whole-genome sequence of ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ strain 9PA from a sweet orange (cultivar Pera) tree collected in São Paulo State, Brazil, is reported. The 9PA genome is 1,231,881 bp, including two prophages, with G+C content of 36.7%. This is the first report of a whole-genome sequence of ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ from Brazil or South America. The 9PA genome sequence will enrich ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ genome resources and facilitate HLB research and control in Brazil and the world.

Prophage Diversity of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ Strains in California

Citation
Dai et al. (2019). Phytopathology® 109 (4)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Subjects
Agronomy and Crop Science Plant Science
Abstract
Huanglongbing (HLB) is a highly destructive citrus disease and is associated with a nonculturable bacterium, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’. ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ in the United States was first found in Florida in 2005 and is now endemic there. In California, ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ was first detected in Hacienda Heights in Los Angeles County in 2012 and has now been detected in multiple urban locations in southern California. Knowledge of ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ strain diversity in California is important for HLB management. In this study, genomic diversity among 10 ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ strains from six California locations were analyzed using a next-generation sequencing (NGS) (Illumina MiSeq and HiSeq) approach. Draft genome sequences of ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ strains were assembled. Sequences of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene and nrdB confirmed ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ identity. Prophages were detected in all ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ strains. The California ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ strains formed four prophage typing groups (PTGs): PTG1, with type 1 prophage only (strains from Anaheim, San Gabriel, and Riverside); PTG2, with type 2 prophage only (strains from Hacienda Heights); PTG1-3, with both type 1 and 3 prophages (a strain from Cerritos); and PTG1-2, with both type 1 and type 2 prophages (a strain from La Habra). Analyses of the terL sequence showed that all California ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ strains were not introduced from Florida but likely from locations in Asia. Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements were found in all ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ strains, yet, a jumping-out event was detected in the ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ strain from Cerritos. Altogether, this study demonstrated that the NGS approach focusing on prophage variation was sensitive and effective in revealing diversity of ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ strains in California.

Two ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ Strains Recently Found in California Harbor Different Prophages

Citation
Zheng et al. (2017). Phytopathology® 107 (6)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Subjects
Agronomy and Crop Science Plant Science
Abstract
‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (CLas), an α-proteobacterium, is associated with citrus Huanglongbing (HLB; yellow shoot disease). In California, two cases of CLas have been detected in Los Angeles County, one in Hacienda Heights in 2012 and the other in San Gabriel in 2015. Although all infected trees were destroyed in compliance with a state mandate, citrus industry stakeholder concerns about HLB in California are high. Little is known about the biology of CLas, particularly the California strains, hindering effective HLB management efforts. In this study, next-generation sequencing technology (Illumina MiSeq) was employed to characterize the California CLas strains. Data sets containing >4 billion (Giga) bp of sequence were generated from each CLas sample. Two prophages (P-HHCA1-2 and P-SGCA5-1) were identified by the MiSeq read mapping technique referenced to two known Florida CLas prophage sequences, SC1 and SC2. P-HHCA1-2 was an SC2-like or Type 2 prophage of 38,989 bp in size. P-SGCA5-1 was an SC1-like or Type 1 prophage of 37,487 bp in size. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that P-HHCA1-2 was part of an Asiatic lineage within the Type 2 prophage group. Similarly, P-SGCA5-1 was part of an Asiatic lineage within Type 1 prophage group. The Asiatic relatedness of both P-HHCA1-2 and P-SGCA5-1 was further presented by single nucleotide polymorphism analysis at terL (encoding prophage terminase) that has been established for CLas strain differentiation. The presence of different prophages suggests that the two California CLas strains could have been introduced from different sources. An alternative explanation is that there was a mixed CLas population containing the two types of prophages, and limited sampling in a geographic region may not accurately depict the true CLas diversity. More accurate pathway analysis may be achieved by including more strains collected from the regions.

Whole-Genome Sequence of “ Candidatus Profftella armatura” from Diaphorina citri in Guangdong, China

Citation
Wu et al. (2015). Genome Announcements 3 (6)
Names
Ca. Profftella armatura
Subjects
Genetics Molecular Biology
Abstract
ABSTRACT The genome of “ Candidatus Profftella armatura” strain YCPA from Diaphorina citri in Guangdong, China, was sequenced. The strain has a chromosome of 457,565 bp, 24.3% G+C content, 364 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), and 38 RNAs, and a plasmid, pYCPA54, of 5,458 bp with 23.9% G+C content and 5 ORFs.

Draft Genome Sequence of “ Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” from Diaphorina citri in Guangdong, China

Citation
Wu et al. (2015). Genome Announcements 3 (6)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Subjects
Genetics Molecular Biology
Abstract
ABSTRACT The draft genome sequence of “ Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” strain YCPsy from an Asian citrus psyllid ( Diaphorina citri ) in Guangdong, China, is reported here. The YCPsy strain has a genome size of 1,233,647 bp, 36.5% G+C content, 1,171 open reading frames (ORFs), and 53 RNAs.

Draft Genome Sequence of “ Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” from a Citrus Tree in San Gabriel, California

Citation
Wu et al. (2015). Genome Announcements 3 (6)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Subjects
Genetics Molecular Biology
Abstract
ABSTRACT The draft genome sequence of “ Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” strain SGCA5 from an orange citrus tree in San Gabriel, California, is reported here. SGCA5 has a genome size of 1,201,445 bp, a G+C content of 36.4%, 1,152 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), and 42 RNA genes.

De Novo Genome Sequence of “ Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” from a Single Potato Psyllid in California

Citation
Wu et al. (2015). Genome Announcements 3 (6)
Names
“Liberibacter solanacearum”
Subjects
Genetics Molecular Biology
Abstract
ABSTRACT The draft genome sequence of “ Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” strain RSTM from a potato psyllid ( Bactericera cockerelli ) in California is reported here. The RSTM strain has a genome size of 1,286,787 bp, a G+C content of 35.1%, 1,211 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), and 43 RNA genes.

‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ Titers in and Infection Effects on Potato Tuber Chemistry of Promising Germplasm Exhibiting Tolerance to Zebra Chip Disease

Citation
Wallis et al. (2015). Phytopathology® 105 (12)
Names
“Liberibacter solanacearum”
Subjects
Agronomy and Crop Science Plant Science
Abstract
Long-term sustainable management of zebra chip (ZC) disease of potato requires development of tolerant or resistant germplasm. To this end, 283 potato varieties and breeding clones were infected with the ZC putative causal agent ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso) by potato psyllid vector inoculations in 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013. Potato germplasm was then examined for development of fresh and fried ZC symptoms. Over multiple years 29 breeding clones exhibited little to no symptoms in freshly cut tuber slices, and five exhibited little to no symptoms in fried slices. These five presumed tolerant breeding clones were chosen for further screening to determine whether the lack of physiological responses to Lso infection was the cause of observed tolerance. To this end, tuber amino acid, sugar, and phenolic levels were compared between noninfected and Lso-infected plants. The five putative tolerant clones had less dramatic shifts in host physiology following Lso infection than the susceptible Atlantic cultivar. This suggested lack of host responses to Lso infection that result in major changes in tuber biochemistry is a potential mechanism of ZC resistance. However, the susceptible Atlantic cultivar did have consistently greater Lso titers compared with two of the tolerant entries, so for these reductions in Lso pathogen progression also might be a factor. Regardless, lack of host responses could still remain one trait that could be used to aid in selection of ZC-resistant potato varieties, as other tolerant lines had infection levels consistent with susceptible Atlantic cultivar. These results also suggest that germplasm derived from relatives of cultivated potato plants are viable sources of ZC disease resistance.

Whole-Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” from a Huanglongbing-Affected Citrus Tree in Central Florida

Citation
Zheng et al. (2015). Genome Announcements 3 (2)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Subjects
Genetics Molecular Biology
Abstract
ABSTRACT Here, we report the draft genome sequence of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” strain FL17, isolated from a huanglongbing (HLB)-affected citrus tree in central Florida. The FL17 genome comprised 1,227,253 bp, with a G+C content of 36.5%, 1,175 predicted open reading frames, and 53 RNA genes.

Effects of Potato-Psyllid-Vectored ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ Infection on Potato Leaf and Stem Physiology

Citation
Wallis et al. (2015). Phytopathology® 105 (2)
Names
“Liberibacter solanacearum”
Subjects
Agronomy and Crop Science Plant Science
Abstract
The bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ is associated with zebra chip disease (ZC), a threat to potato production in North America and New Zealand. It is vectored by potato psyllids. Previous studies observed that ‘Ca. L. solanacearum’ infection causes potato tubers to undergo ZC-symptom-associated shifts in physiology, such as increased levels of amino acids, sugars, and phenolics. However, little is known about how ‘Ca. L. solanacearum’ infections caused by psyllid vector feeding may affect metabolism in potato foliage and stems. This study compared metabolism in potato plants fed upon by ‘Ca. L. solanacearum’-positive psyllids with potato plants not exposed to psyllids. Foliar levels of asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamine, fructose, glucose, sucrose, a ferulic acid derivative, and quinic acid were lower in ‘Ca. L. solanacearum’-inoculated than noninfected plants. However, foliar levels of proline, serine, four phenolic compounds, and most terpenoids were greater in ‘Ca. L. solanacearum’-inoculated than noninfected plants. Upper stem levels of asparagine and aspartic acid, upper and lower stem levels of ellagitannins and most monoterpenoids, and lower stem level of sesquiterpenoids were greater in ‘Ca. L. solanacearum’-inoculated than noninfected plants. These results suggest that many defense-related terpenoid compounds might increase in plants which had psyllids inoculate ‘Ca. L. solanacearum’. This could impact progression and spread of ZC.