Tamborindeguy, Cecilia


Publications (20)

Effects of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ haplotypes A and B on tomato gene expression and geotropism

Citation
Harrison et al. (2022). BMC Plant Biology 22 (1)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter solanacearum
Subjects
Plant Science
Abstract
Abstract Background The tomato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli Šulc (Hemiptera: Triozidae), is a pest of solanaceous crops such as tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) in the U.S. and vectors the disease-causing pathogen ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (or Lso). Disease symptom severity is dependent on Lso haplotype: tomato plants infected with Lso haplotype B experience more severe symptoms and higher mortality compared to plants infected with Lso haplotype A. By characterizing the molecular differences in the tomato plant’s responses to Lso haplotypes, the key components of LsoB virulence can be identified and, thus, targeted for disease mitigation strategies. Results To characterize the tomato plant genes putatively involved in the differential immune responses to Lso haplotypes A and B, RNA was extracted from tomato ‘Moneymaker’ leaves 3 weeks after psyllid infestation. Gene expression levels were compared between uninfected tomato plants (i.e., controls and plants infested with Lso-free psyllids) and infected plants (i.e., plants infested with psyllids infected with either Lso haplotype A or Lso haplotype B). Furthermore, expression levels were compared between plants infected with Lso haplotype A and plants infected with Lso haplotype B. A whole transcriptome analysis identified 578 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between uninfected and infected plants as well as 451 DEGs between LsoA- and LsoB-infected plants. These DEGs were primarily associated with plant defense against abiotic and biotic stressors, growth/development, plant primary metabolism, transport and signaling, and transcription/translation. These gene expression changes suggested that tomato plants traded off plant growth and homeostasis for improved defense against pathogens, especially when infected with LsoB. Consistent with these results, tomato plant growth experiments determined that LsoB-infected plants were significantly stunted and had impaired negative geotropism. However, it appeared that the defense responses mounted by tomatoes were insufficient for overcoming the disease symptoms and mortality caused by LsoB infection, while these defenses could compensate for LsoA infection. Conclusion The transcriptomic analysis and growth experiments demonstrated that Lso-infected tomato plants underwent gene expression changes related to abiotic and biotic stressors, impaired growth/development, impaired plant primary metabolism, impaired transport and signaling transduction, and impaired transcription/translation. Furthermore, the transcriptomic analysis also showed that LsoB-infected plants, relative to LsoA-infected, experienced more severe stunting, had improved responses to some stressors and impaired responses to others, had poorer transport and signaling transduction, and had impaired carbohydrate synthesis and photosynthesis.

Identification of Autophagy-Related Genes in the Potato Psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli and Their Expression Profile in Response to ‘Candidatus Liberibacter Solanacearum’ in the Gut

Citation
Tang, Tamborindeguy (2021). Insects 12 (12)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter solanacearum Liberibacter
Subjects
Insect Science
Abstract
Autophagy, also known as type II programmed cell death, is a cellular mechanism of “self-eating”. Autophagy plays an important role against pathogen infection in numerous organisms. Recently, it has been demonstrated that autophagy can be activated and even manipulated by plant viruses to facilitate their transmission within insect vectors. However, little is known about the role of autophagy in the interactions of insect vectors with plant bacterial pathogens. ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso) is a phloem-limited Gram-negative bacterium that infects crops worldwide. Two Lso haplotypes, LsoA and LsoB, are transmitted by the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli and cause damaging diseases in solanaceous plants (e.g., zebra chip in potatoes). Both LsoA and LsoB are transmitted by the potato psyllid in a persistent circulative manner: they colonize and replicate within psyllid tissues. Following acquisition, the gut is the first organ Lso encounters and could be a barrier for transmission. In this study, we annotated autophagy-related genes (ATGs) from the potato psyllid transcriptome and evaluated their expression in response to Lso infection at the gut interface. In total, 19 ATGs belonging to 17 different families were identified. The comprehensive expression profile analysis revealed that the majority of the ATGs were regulated in the psyllid gut following the exposure or infection to each Lso haplotype, LsoA and LsoB, suggesting a potential role of autophagy in response to Lso at the psyllid gut interface.

Acquisition and transmission of two ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ haplotypes by the tomato psyllid Bactericera cockerelli

Citation
Tang et al. (2020). Scientific Reports 10 (1)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter solanacearum
Subjects
Multidisciplinary
Abstract
Abstract‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso) is a pathogen of solanaceous crops. Two haplotypes of Lso (LsoA and LsoB) are present in North America; both are transmitted by the tomato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc), in a circulative and propagative manner and cause damaging plant diseases (e.g. Zebra chip in potatoes). In this study, we investigated the acquisition and transmission of LsoA or LsoB by the tomato psyllid. We quantified the titer of Lso haplotype A and B in adult psyllid guts after several acquisition access periods (AAPs). We also performed sequential inoculation of tomato plants by adult psyllids following a 7-day AAP and compared the transmission of each Lso haplotype. The results indicated that LsoB population increased faster in the psyllid gut than LsoA. Further, LsoB population plateaued after 12 days, while LsoA population increased slowly during the 16 day-period evaluated. Additionally, LsoB had a shorter latent period and higher transmission rate than LsoA following a 7 day-AAP: LsoB was first transmitted by the adult psyllids between 17 and 21 days following the beginning of the AAP, while LsoA was first transmitted between 21 and 25 days after the beginning of the AAP. Overall, our data suggest that the two Lso haplotypes have distinct acquisition and transmission rates. The information provided in this study will improve our understanding of the biology of Lso acquisition and transmission as well as its relationship with the tomato psyllid at the gut interface.

Lso-HPE1, an Effector of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’, Can Repress Plant Immune Response

Citation
Levy et al. (2020). Phytopathology® 110 (3)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter solanacearum
Subjects
Agronomy and Crop Science Plant Science
Abstract
‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ is a plant pathogen affecting the families Solanaceae and Apiaceae in different parts of the world. ‘Ca. L. solanacearum’ is a Gram-negative, fastidious α-proteobacterium that is vectored by different psyllid species. Plant-pathogenic bacteria are known for interfering with the host physiology or defense mechanisms, often by secreting bacterial effectors. Effector proteins are critical for virulence; therefore, the identification of effectors could help with disease management. In this study, we characterized the Sec-translocon-dependent ‘Ca. L. solanacearum’–hypothetical protein effector 1 (Lso-HPE1). We compared this protein sequence in the different ‘Ca. L. solanacearum’ haplotypes. We predicted the signal peptide and validated its function using Escherichia coli’s alkaline phosphatase fusion assay. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana demonstrated that Lso-HPE1 from ‘Ca. L. solanacearum’ haplotypes A and B were able to inhibit the induction of cell death in plants. We also compared gene expression of the Lso-HPE1- transcripts in ‘Ca. L. solanacearum’ haplotypes A and B in tomato and in the vector Bactericera cockerelli. This work validates the identification of a Sec-translocon-dependent ‘Ca. L. solanacearum’ protein possibly involved in suppression of plant cell death.

No Evidence of Apoptotic Response of the Potato Psyllid Bactericera cockerelli to “ Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” at the Gut Interface

Citation
Tang, Tamborindeguy (2019). Infection and Immunity 88 (1)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter solanacearum
Subjects
Immunology Infectious Diseases Microbiology Parasitology
Abstract
“ Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” is a pathogen transmitted by the potato psyllid Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc) (Hemiptera: Triozidae) in a persistent manner. In this study, we investigated the molecular interaction between “ Ca. Liberibacter solanacearum” and the potato psyllid at the gut interface. Specifically, we focused on the apoptotic response of potato psyllids to the infection by two “ Ca. Liberibacter solanacearum” haplotypes, LsoA and LsoB.

Mycorrhization Mitigates Disease Caused by “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” in Tomato

Citation
Tiénébo et al. (2019). Plants 8 (11)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter solanacearum
Subjects
Ecology Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics Plant Science
Abstract
Disease caused by the bacterial pathogen “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” (Lso) represents a serious threat to solanaceous crop production. Insecticide applications to control the psyllid vector, Bactericera cockerelli Šulc (Hemiptera: Triozidae) has led to the emergence of resistance in psyllids populations. Efforts to select natural resistant cultivars have been marginally successful and have been complicated by the presence of distinct Lso haplotypes (LsoA, LsoB) differing in symptoms severity on potato and tomato. A potentially promising management tool is to boost host resistance to the pathogen and/or the insect vector by promoting mycorrhization. Here we tested the hypothesis that mycorrhizal fungi can mitigate the effect of Lso infection on tomato plants. The presence of mycorrhizal fungi substantially delayed and reduced the incidence of Lso-induced symptoms on tomato as compared to non-mycorrhized plants. However, PCR with specific Lso primers revealed that mycorrhization did not prevent Lso transmission or translocation to newly formed leaves. Mycorrhization significantly reduced oviposition by psyllids harboring LsoA and survival of nymphs from these eggs. However, mycorrhization had no effect on oviposition by psyllids harboring LsoB or the survival of nymphs from parents harboring LsoB. These findings indicate the use of mycorrhizal fungi is a promising strategy for the mitigation of disease caused by both LsoA and LsoB and warrants additional field testing.

Infection by Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ haplotypes A and B in Solanum lycopersicum ‘Moneymaker’

Citation
Mendoza-Herrera et al. (2018). Plant Disease 102 (10)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter solanacearum
Subjects
Agronomy and Crop Science Plant Science
Abstract
‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ is a plant pathogen associated with diseases affecting several crops of the Solanaceae and Apiaceae families. Two ‘Ca. L. solanacearum’ haplotypes (LsoA and LsoB) infect solanaceous crops in North America and are transmitted by the tomato psyllid Bactericera cockerelli. Although both ‘Ca. L. solanacearum’ haplotypes cause zebra chip in potato, the diseases associated with each haplotype in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) have not been described. ‘Ca. L. solanacearum’-infected tomato plants exhibit symptoms resembling those of permanent yellowing disease (known in Mexico as “permanente del tomate”) and sometimes called psyllid yellows. In this study, the symptoms associated with each ‘Ca. L. solanacearum’ haplotype in tomato were compared, and the bacterial abundance in different nodes of the plants was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Surprisingly, both plant phenotype and bacterium distribution were different between LsoA- and LsoB-infected plants. Plants infected with LsoB died prematurely, whereas those infected with LsoA did not. Across the measured time points, LsoB abundance in infected plants was consistent with previous reports describing a sink to source gradient, while such gradient was only observed in LsoA-infected plants early after infection. This is the first report describing the differences in symptoms in tomato associated with two ‘Ca. L. solanacearum’ haplotypes, LsoA and LsoB.