Sétamou, Mamoudou


Publications
10

Diversity of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” strains in Texas revealed by prophage sequence analyses

Citation
De Leon et al. (2024). Plant Disease
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Abstract
Prophages/phages are important components of the genome of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (CLas), an unculturable alphaproteobacterium associated with citrus Huanglongbing (HLB) disease. Phage variations have significant contributions to CLas strain diversity research, which provide critical information for HLB management. In this study, prophage variations among selected CLas strains from southern Texas were studied. The CLas strains were collected from three different CLas inhabitant env

A Field Deployable Real-Time Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Targeting Five Copy nrdB Gene for the Detection of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ in Citrus

Citation
Danda et al. (2023). The Plant Pathology Journal 39 (4)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Abstract
Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most destructive diseases in citrus, which imperils the sustainability of citriculture worldwide. The presumed causal agent of HLB, ‘<i>Candidatus</i> Liberibacter asiaticus’ (CLas) is a non-culturable phloem-limited α-proteobacterium transmitted by Asian citrus psyllids (ACP, <i>Diaphorina citri</i> Kuwayama). A widely adopted method for HLB diagnosis is based on quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Although HLB diagn

Optimization of vqPCR for Reliable Detection of Viable Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus in Citrus

Citation
Louzada et al. (2022). HortScience 57 (6)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus Liberibacter
Abstract
Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB, also known as “citrus greening”), an important disease worldwide, is associated with three species of phloem-limited Candidatus liberibacter, of which Candidatus L. asiaticus (CLas) is the predominant one that has severely affected citrus production. TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (TM) has been the standard and very efficient method to diagnose several strains of Candidatus Liberibacter in citrus; however, it detects total bacteria and is unable to di

Plant hairy roots enable high throughput identification of antimicrobials against Candidatus Liberibacter spp

Citation
Irigoyen et al. (2020). Nature Communications 11 (1)
Names
Liberibacter
Abstract
AbstractA major bottleneck in identifying therapies to control citrus greening and other devastating plant diseases caused by fastidious pathogens is our inability to culture the pathogens in defined media or axenic cultures. As such, conventional approaches for antimicrobial evaluation (genetic or chemical) rely on time-consuming, low-throughput and inherently variable whole-plant assays. Here, we report that plant hairy roots support the growth of fastidious pathogens like Candidatus Liberibac

Distribution of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus in Citrus and the Asian Citrus Psyllid in Texas Over a Decade

Citation
Sétamou et al. (2020). Plant Disease 104 (4)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Abstract
Huanglongbing (HLB, citrus greening disease) in the major citrus-producing states of the United States is associated with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), which is vectored by the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP). Surveys were conducted in Texas from 2007 to 2017 to assess the prevalence and titer of CLas in ACPs and citrus trees. ACP and citrus leaf tissue samples were collected from suspect trees in residential areas and commercial groves (orchards) and assayed for CLas by quantitative PCR

Quantitative Distribution of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus in the Aerial Parts of the Huanglongbing-infected Citrus Trees in Texas

Citation
Kunta et al. (2014). HortScience 49 (1)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Abstract
The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, one of the known vectors for citrus greening disease or Huanglongbing (HLB) pathogens, has been present in Texas for over a decade, but the detection of the disease is recent. HLB has been confirmed in only two adjacent commercial citrus groves of grapefruit and sweet orange. A study was conducted to compare the population of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) cells in different plant parts including peduncle, columella, leaves, seeds, y

Survey and Detection of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ in a Citrus Nursery Facility in South Texas

Citation
Alabi et al. (2014). Plant Health Progress 15 (4)
Names
Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus
Abstract
Huanglongbing (HLB) disease, associated with ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (CLas), is primarily spread via infected citrus nursery trees and by infective Asian citrus psyllid, the insect vector. Recently, the Texas Department of Agriculture initiated regulations requiring commercial and retail citrus nurseries in Texas to transition from traditional open-field to enclosed facilities with insect-resistant screens to mitigate the risk of nurseries serving as sources of CLas. Although severa